Build your own outdoor photo booth: setting the stage for great wedding photos

A pergola-inspired outdoor photo booth standing in a field
Say cheese: the outdoor photo booth, built to the style of a pergola, sets the stage for special moments you’ll want to capture.

  • Difficulty
    medium
  • Cost
    80-100 €
  • Duration
    4-5 h

Introduction

Are you planning a wedding or big celebration? If so, then having a photo booth is an absolute must. Your guests will be able to take great photos and capture special or unusual moments while you’re enjoying the party. Our DIY wedding-themed photo booth will prove a huge draw at your party. We’ll give step-by-step instructions on how to build your own photo booth.

Have you heard about our 18-volt system yet? It offers a very wide variety of devices for many uses. The thing that makes the project below so special is that you can use the same rechargeable battery for every part of this project. Simply swap out the battery pack, insert it into a different device that is part of the 18-volt system and continue to the next step.

It should go without saying that your safety is paramount throughout every step of the project, so make sure you take the necessary precautions to protect yourself. You can find everything you need to know about the correct protective clothing you need when using each type of tool in our overview.

You need
Utilities
  • pencil
  • g-clamps
  • pocket rule
Materials
  • Six pieces of squared timber A: 2,500 x 45 x 45 mm
  • Eight wooden slats B: 2,500 x 20 x 60 mm
  • Two wooden slats C: 2,210 x 20 x 60 mm
  • Four pieces of squared timber D: 1,250 x 45 x 45 mm
  • Torx screws (4 x 80 mm)
L: Length, W: Width, H: Height, D: Diameter

Let's go - step by step

Step 1 7

Reviewing the plans and getting an overview of the materials

A drawing illustrates the outdoor photo box as it will look when it’s finished (shown with the list of all materials).
You will find the wooden slats in the list of materials, marked with the letters A, B and C.

Before you get started, it’s best to review the building plans. The rough sketch shows exactly where each of the wooden slats (as seen in list of materials) will go.

Step 2 7

Sawing the squared timbers to length

Use a pocket rule to make the measurements on a squared timber and mark out the points where the cuts will be made using a pencil.
A squared timber is being shortened using a jigsaw.
The cut edge of a square timber is being sanded down.

You need: Multi-sander, Sanding paper for multi-sanders, Jigsaws, Jigsaw blade T 101 B, g-clamps, pencil, pocket rule, Four pieces of squared timber D: 1,250 x 45 x 45 mm

In step one, you’ll be building the pergola-inspired roof structure of the outdoor photo box. For this you’ll need four squared timbers (D) (length: 1,250 mm; image 1). Cut them to the desired length (image 2) and sand the cut edges (image 3).
Smart and practical: If you are using the Bosch 18-volt system, you can also take the rechargeable battery from the jigsaw and use it on your sander.

Step 3 7

Marking and drilling the holes

Two squared timbers are lying on a workbench. The desired length is being measured out using a pocket rule.
Holes are being drilled in squared timbers using a cordless combi drill.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Wood Drill Bit Set, pocket rule, pencil, g-clamps, Squared timbers (D) from step 1

Now place the squared timbers you just cut to length on your workbench. It’s better to begin with two of them placed side by side. When you’re done, proceed to the other two boards.

Now measure the following lengths where you will later drill the holes on each of the boards (image 1): Make the first marking 90 mm from the edge, followed by three more at intervals of 330 mm. Place the four markings for the holes in the middle of the board (see image 2).

Now drill the holes.

Step 4 7

Building the roof structure – part 1

Four wooden slats are lying parallel to each other on the floor. A squared timber is placed on one side.
Four wooden slats connected to a squared timber using a screw.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Wood Drill Bit Set, g-clamps, pencil, Eight wooden slats B: 2,500 x 20 x 60 mm, Squared timbers (D) from step 2, Screws (4 x 80 mm)

Now assemble the roof for the pergola, which is made out of two identical pieces.
Begin by placing four of the wooden slats with the narrow end facing down on the floor. Measure 140 mm from the end of the slat, mark the spot and place one of the squared timbers there (image 1).

Then connect the squared timbers to the wooden slats. To do so, fasten the screws in the holes you made in step 2 (image 2). You can use the same 18-volt rechargeable battery you used in steps 2–3 to sand and cut the boards to now fasten the screws.

Repeat the same process on the other side of the wooden slat. Also place a squared timber 140 mm from the edge and fasten in place with a screw.

You are now done with the first half of the roof structure. Repeat the same steps to assemble the second, matching piece.

Step 5 7

Building the roof – part 2

Additional squared timbers are placed on a wooden structure made of slats.
Additional squared timbers are screwed to a wooden structure made of slats.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Two pieces of squared timber A: 2,500 x 45 x 45 mm (plus one that is the same size as a spacer), Torx screws (4 x 80 mm)

Attach a further squared timber to the two pieces of the roof structure from step 3 to provide added stability. When doing so, first flip the two halves of the roof structure over so that the thin wooden slats are facing down.

Now take two squared timbers and place them on the inside next to the outermost roof batten (image 1). Please note that the squared timber in the middle is only being used as a spacer here. That means only screw on the other squared timber (image 2).

Repeat this step for the second half of the roof structure.

Step 6 7

Connecting the roof structure

A second roof batten is placed on its side on a wooden structure made of slats.
A second roof batten is placed on its side on a wooden structure made of slats.
A second roof batten is screwed from the side to a wooden structure made of slats.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Multi-sander, G80 sanding paper, Jigsaws, Jigsaw blade T 101 B, pocket rule, pencil, g-clamps, Two wooden slats C: 2,210 x 20 x 60 mm, Torx screws (4 x 80 mm)

You’ve created the roof structure out of two identical pieces. This was done in order to make it easier to disassemble it for transport. To use the pergola, you will first need to connect the two halves again.

To do this, you’ll require two wooden slats (2,210 x 20 x 60 mm). Cut them to length and carefully sand the cut edges.

Now place the two parts of the roof structure so that they’re lying flush together on the floor (see image 1).

In the next step, position one of the two wooden slats you cut to length on its side. Refer to image 2 to see where exactly you need to place it (flush with the outer squared timber).

Screw the slat in place. You can use as many – or as few – screws as you want. What matters most is that the two parts of the roof structure are firmly connected. (The more screws you use, the more time it will take to disassemble the roof structure for transport.) Conversely, the fewer screws you use, the less stable the roof structure will be. Always takes this into account when deciding how many screws to use.)

Repeat the steps for the wooden slat on the opposite side.

Step 7 7

Attaching the legs

A squared timber is being fastened to a wooden structure to act as a leg.
A squared timber is being screwed to the corner of a wooden structure to act as a leg.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Four pieces of squared timber A: 2,500 x 45 x 45 mm, Torx screws (4 x 80 mm)

You are now finished with your roof structure. Now all that’s missing are the four legs.

First, place one of the 2,500 mm squared timbers on one of the corners of the roof structure; they are easy to find in this standard length. Refer to image 1 to see how to insert the leg between the other slats and squared timbers.

Then fasten the leg in place (images 1 and 2). Use six screws, three on each side, to ensure the leg is stable on all sides.

Repeat these steps to attach the other three legs.

Well done! Your outdoor photo box with a pergola-style roof is now finished. Now all you have to do is flip it up onto its legs. Ideally, find someone to assist you.

Before you set it up, add a few decorative touches to the photo box.

The wedding look is a fun one. Solar-powered lamps and other lights help create a cool look and a romantic feel, especially late in the evening.