Minimalistic: DIY wall clock with copper detail

A square, wooden clock with copper detail stands on a hall table.
Looks the part standing on a shelf or hanging on the wall: The minimalistic DIY clock.

  • Difficulty
    easy
  • Cost
    30-55 £
  • Duration
    1-3 h

Introduction

Are minimalistic, chic interiors your thing? Then this DIY clock made out of wood and copper elements is the right choice for you. We’ll show you how to build your own wall clock in a few simple steps.

Have you heard about our 18-volt system yet? It offers a very wide variety of devices for many uses. The thing that makes the project below so special is that you can use the same rechargeable battery for every part of this project. Simply swap out the battery pack, insert it into a different device that is part of the 18-volt system and continue to the next step.

It should go without saying that your safety is paramount throughout every step of the project, so make sure you take the necessary precautions to protect yourself. You can find everything you need to know about the correct protective clothing you need when using each type of tool in our overview.

You need
Utilities
  • pencil
  • pocket rule
  • Set square
  • g-clamps
  • wood glue
  • masking tape
  • masking paper
Materials
  • 2x plywood board, 100 x 500 mm, 12 mm thick
  • 2x plywood board, 100 x 524 mm, 12 mm thick
  • Matt black spray paint
  • 2x reclaimed wooden board, 500 mm
  • 4x bracket (black), 40 x 50 mm
  • 16x wood screws, 3 x 12 mm
  • 2x universal screws, 4 x 40 mm
  • 1x copper pipe, 22 mm diameter, 500 mm in length
  • 2x corks
  • 1x quartz clock movement, shaft min. 31 mm
  • 1x clock hand set, length: 135/100 mm
L: Length, W: Width, H: Height, D: Diameter

Let's go - step by step

Step 1 9

Marking the holes

A measurement is being marked on a wooden board.
Use a set square or pocket rule to mark off the measurements.

You need: pencil, Set square, 2x plywood board, 100 x 500 mm, 12 mm thick

First, on two plywood boards (100 x 500 mm), mark the holes where the copper pipe will be attached later, 170 mm from the short side and 30 mm from the long side.

 

Step 2 9

Drilling the holes

A cordless combi drill is being used to drill a hole in a wooden board.
When drilling, place a piece of scrap wood underneath so that you don’t damage your work bench.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Brad point drill bit, g-clamps, Scrap wooden board, 2x plywood board, 100 x 500 mm, 12 mm thick with marks from step 1

Then, secure the plywood boards (100 x 500 mm) in turn to the work bench using G-clamps. Now, use a 3 mm Brad point drill bit to drill a hole through each board at the previously marked place.

Step 3 9

Sanding

A wooden board is being sanded.
Use a fine sanding sheet for sanding.

You need: Multi-sander, G80 sanding paper, g-clamps, 2x plywood board, 100 x 500 mm, 12 mm thick, 2x plywood board, 100 x 524 mm, 12 mm thick

Once you have drilled the holes, sand the boards well, particularly the sides and edges. Use a fine sanding sheet to do so.

Step 4 9

Gluing the frame together

Wood glue is being applied to a wooden board.
When gluing the frame together, make sure each board is in the correct position.

You need: wood glue, masking tape, 2x plywood board, 100 x 500 mm, 12 mm thick with holes from step 2, 2x plywood board, 100 x 524 mm, 12 mm thick

Then glue the four plywood boards flush together to make the frame. The two boards with the pre-drilled holes must be opposite one another. Hold the glued corners in place with masking tape.

Step 5 9

Spraying

A wooden frame is being sprayed with black paint.
Make sure the paint is sprayed evenly.

You need: Multi-sander, G80 sanding paper, masking paper, Matt black spray paint

Before the next step, cover your work bench fully with paper. Now, spray the frame structure black from all sides. For a particularly even finish, sand everything off using a G240 sanding sheet once the first coat of paint has dried and then spray again.

Step 6 9

Drilling the reclaimed wooden board

A cordless combi drill is being used to drill a hole in a reclaimed wooden board.
Clamp the board securely to your work bench so that it is stable.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Brad point drill bit, pencil, pocket rule, g-clamps, Reclaimed wooden board, 500 mm

On one of the reclaimed wooden boards, mark a drill hole centrally between the long sides and 150 mm from the short side. Then secure the board to the work bench using a G-clamp and drill a hole at the marked place using a 10 mm Brad point drill bit.

Step 7 9

Securing the reclaimed wooden board in the frame

A wooden board is being screwed into a black wooden frame.
Make sure the board is positioned correctly in the frame.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Suitable bit set, pencil, pocket rule, Reclaimed wooden boards, 500 mm, Brackets (black), 40 x 50 mm, Wood screws, 3 x 12 mm

Now, screw one bracket onto each vertical side so that it sits flush and is 200 mm from the horizontal side. Then screw the reclaimed wooden board onto the bracket using the pre-drilled hole and a 3 x 12 mm wood screw. Then attach the second reclaimed wooden board 30 mm underneath.

Warning
A word of caution:
Make sure the pre-drilled holes for the copper pipe are in the correct position (see title picture).
 
Step 8 9

Attaching the clock movement

A clock movement and hands are being attached to a wooden board.
A little patience and careful manoeuvring is needed to fit the delicate clock hands.

You need: Quartz clock movement, shaft min. 31 mm, Clock hand set, length: 135/100 mm

Now, insert the movement on the rear of the pre-drilled reclaimed wooden board and attach the hands on the front.

Step 9 9

Inserting the copper pipe

A copper pipe is being attached inside a wooden frame.
The corks should fit securely in the copper pipe.

You need: Cordless combi drill, Suitable bit set, Universal screws, 4 x 40 mm, Copper pipe, 22 mm diameter, 500 mm in length, Corks

Before putting the copper pipe in the frame, securely seal each end using the corks (use a craft knife to cut them to size if necessary). Then attach the pipe securely in the frame using two 4 x 40 mm universal screws in the pre-drilled holes.

The only thing left to do now is to find the perfect spot for your finished wall clock.