Get organised: creative wardrobe hooks

Wardrobe hooks, which are made of a combination of round pieces of green-painted wood and brown leather loops, are attached to a wall. A scarf, a handbag and a coat hang from the hooks.
It’s easy to create personalised wardrobe hooks for your coats, bags, scarves, etc. using full-grain leather straps, pine dowels and pieces of glued wood.

  • Difficulty
    easy
  • Cost
    60 £
  • Duration
    1-3 h

Introduction

A traditional wardrobe rack would take up too much space in your hall? But you would still like to have a convenient way to hang up your coats, bags, scarves and all the rest that doesn’t look stuffy? These creative wardrobe hooks are extremely flexible, yet capable of transforming your hallway into a fashionable space. We’ll show you how to make these hooks in a few simple steps.

It should go without saying that your safety is paramount at every stage of the project. Make sure you take the necessary precautions to protect yourself. You can find everything you need to know about the protective clothing you need for each type of tool in our guide.

You need
Utilities
  • safety glasses
  • protective gloves
  • hammer
  • pencil
  • paintbrush
  • protective padding
  • scissors
  • g-clamps
Materials
  • 7x screws (6 x 140 mm)
  • 7x wall plugs, size 8
  • 6 mm punch
  • 1x pine dowel, cylindrical, 60 cm long / 2.8 cm in diameter (sufficient for seven hooks)
  • 3x strips of full-grain leather, 2.8 cm wide, 1.2 m long (3.6 m in total)
  • 1x glued wood board, spruce, solid wood, 80 cm x 20 cm x 1.8 cm (cut to size at your local DIY store)
  • Wood varnish 2-in-1 (varnish & primer), satin-finish
L: Length, W: Width, H: Height, D: Diameter

Let's go - step by step

Step 1 7

Measuring the lengths of the wooden dowels

A Zamo measuring tape adapter is used to measure the length on a cylindrical wooden dowel.

You need: Bosch Zamo, Zamo - Tape Adapter, pencil, Wooden dowel, cylindrical

Attach the Zamo to the end of the dowel and measure seven lengths of 60 mm each using the tape measure adapter. Mark each length using a pencil.

Step 2 7

Sawing the wooden dowel into sections

A cylindrical wooden dowel is cut into 60 mm long pieces using a Bosch jigsaw.

You need: Cordless jigsaw PST 18 LI, Jigsaw blade T 101 B, Bosch AdvancedImpact 18 cordless impact drill, Sandpaper and sanding block, wood drill bit, g-clamps, safety glasses, work gloves, Wooden dowel, cylindrical

After you have measured the lengths on the dowel, you’re ready to start sawing. To do so, first clamp the dowel to your work surface using two G-clamps. It will help you saw more precisely and, above all, safely. Saw the dowel into the lengths you marked in pencil. Now use the sandpaper and the sanding block. Bend the sandpaper and fold it up over the edges of the sanding block. Carefully remove the rough parts of the wood and sand down the edges smoothly.

Step 3 7

Cutting seven circles out of a shelving board using a holesaw bit

Circles are cut out of a glued wood board using a holesaw drill bit.

You need: Bosch AdvancedImpact 18 cordless impact drill, Holesaw drill bit (83 mm in diameter), with fitting adapter, Tool Steel Countersink, Sandpaper and sanding block, g-clamps, safety glasses, paintbrush, protective padding, 2 in 1 wood varnish (varnish and primer) silk matt, Glued wood panel

We will prepare the dowels now. Mark the centre of each dowel on one side of the cross-section. Now carefully drill through the dowel vertically at the marked spot. Make sure that you position it precisely in the centre of the dowel. To do so, use a 7-mm Brad point drill bit. Tip: Try clamping the dowel to a work surface using a G-clamp. It will help you drill more carefully.

Step 4 7

Measuring and cutting the strips of leather

A Zamo measuring tape adapter is used to measure the length of the strips of leather.

You need: Bosch Zamo, Zamo - Tape Adapter, pencil, scissors, Full-grain leather

Place a strip of full-grain leather on a work surface. Place the Zamo at the end of the strip of full-grain leather and measure a length of 40 cm for each leather loop. Mark the distances with a pencil and cut the leather into smaller strips using scissors.

Step 5 7

Punching holes in the strips of leather

A hammer and punch are used to punch holes into a strip of brown leather.

You need: hammer, 6 mm punch, Strips of leather, cut to size in step 4

Now punch a hole in the leather at both ends of the strips of leather for the loops. Place the strip of leather for the loop on a work surface and position the punch in the centre of the ends of the loop. Make sure to leave a distance of 1.5 cm to the edges and the end of the strip of leather. Use the hammer to make a hole in the leather with the punch. Important: If you fold the strip of leather in half making a loop and placing the ends on top of each other, the holes should be aligned.

 

Step 6 7

Attaching the upper row of wardrobe hooks to the wall

An Atino line level is attached to a wall. The LED lights up green. A person pulls out the integrated tape measure of the Atino horizontally and draws X’s on the wall.
An Atino line level is attached to a wall. The LED lights up green. A person pulls out the integrated tape measure of the Atino horizontally and draws X’s on the wall.

You need: Bosch Atino, Bosch AdvancedImpact 18 cordless impact drill, pencil, 10 mm wall plugs, Screws, 140 mm long, 10 mm concrete drill bit, Wooden dowel, cylindrical, Strips of leather, cut to size, Round pieces of wood

You can now start positioning the first of the wardrobe hooks. Attach an Atino line level to your wall, align it until the LED lights up green and mark the first drill hole in the centre of the Atino. Pull out the tape measure horizontally and use a pencil to mark the drill holes for the remaining wall hooks along the upper row (image 1). You can choose whatever distance you want. Now rotate the Atino 90 degrees clockwise until the LED lights up green again. Now mark another X on the wall at the distance of your choice (image 2) – but make sure it’s just barely visible. It will help you line up the lower row of three hooks more accurately in the next step.

Now drill holes in the wall at the marked spots along the upper row using the cordless impact drill with a 10 mm concrete drill bit. Then sink a 10 mm wall plug into each hole.

Now it’s time to prepare the wardrobe hooks for the top row of your new wardrobe. Thread each piece onto a screw that is 140 mm long starting with the round piece of wood, then the cylindrical dowel and finally the leather loop. Then attach the finished hooks to the wall using a cordless impact drill.

Step 7 7

Positioning and attaching the lower row of wardrobe hooks

Four wardrobe hooks hang in a row on a wall. The round Atino is attached to the wall under the left-most hook. A person pulls out the integrated tape measure of the Atino horizontally and draws further X’s on the wall.

You need: Bosch Atino, Bosch AdvancedImpact 18 cordless impact drill, pencil, 10 mm wall plugs, Screws, 140 mm long, 10 mm concrete drill bit, Wooden dowel, cylindrical, Strips of leather, cut to size, Round pieces of wood

Determining the position of the lower row of wardrobe hooks means attaching the Atino line level to the wall under the left-most hook at your barely visible marking. Then align the line level horizontally until the LED lights up green. Pull out the tape measure and place an X on the wall in the middle and just under the first two hooks in the upper row. Pull the tape measure out further, marking the two remaining drill holes in the middle and just under the next pair of hooks. Why? We have staggered the second row slightly, preventing garments and items from getting tangled up later on.

Now assemble the wardrobe hooks just like you did in step 8, drill the holes, insert the wall plugs and attach the hooks to the wall using the cordless impact drill. Your DIY wardrobe is now ready for use! You now have a real eye-catcher in your front hall with lots of space for your coats, bags, scarves and all the rest.